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Chapter 26 21 For these causes the Jews caught me in the temple, and went about to kill me.22 Having therefore obtained help of God, I continue unto this day, witnessing both to small and great, saying none other things than those which the prophets and Moses did say should come:23 That Christ should suffer, and that he should be the first that should rise from the dead, and should shew light unto the people, and to the Gentiles.24 And as he thus spake for himself, Festus said with a loud voice, Paul, thou art beside thyself; much learning doth make thee mad.25 But he said, I am not mad, most noble Festus; but speak forth the words of truth and soberness.26 For the king knoweth of these things, before whom also I speak freely: for I am persuaded that none of these things are hidden from him; for this thing was not done in a corner.27 King Agrippa, believest thou the prophets? I know that thou believest.28 Then Agrippa said unto Paul, Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian.29 And Paul said, I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.30 And when he had thus spoken, the king rose up, and the governor, and Bernice, and they that sat with them:31 And when they were gone aside, they talked between themselves, saying, This man doeth nothing worthy of death or of bonds.32 Then said Agrippa unto Festus, This man might have been set at liberty, if he had not appealed unto Caesar.

Chapter 27 1 And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners unto one named Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band.2 And entering into a ship of Adramyttium, we launched, meaning to sail by the coasts of Asia; one Aristarchus, a Macedonian of Thessalonica, being with us.3 And the next day we touched at Sidon. And Julius courteously entreated Paul, and gave him liberty to go unto his friends to refresh himself.4 And when we had launched from thence, we sailed under Cyprus, because the winds were contrary.5 And when we had sailed over the sea of Cilicia and Pamphylia, we came to Myra, a city of Lycia.6 And there the centurion found a ship of Alexandria sailing into Italy; and he put us therein.7 And when we had sailed slowly many days, and scarce were come over against Cnidus, the wind not suffering us, we sailed under Crete, over against Salmone;8 And, hardly passing it, came unto a place which is called The fair havens; nigh whereunto was the city of Lasea.