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Chapter 6 1 Not long after this the king sent an old man of Athens to compel the Jews to depart from the laws of their fathers, and not to live after the laws of God:2 And to pollute also the temple in Jerusalem, and to call it the temple of Jupiter Olympius; and that in Garizim, of Jupiter the Defender of strangers, as they did desire that dwelt in the place.3 The coming in of this mischief was sore and grievous to the people:4 For the temple was filled with riot and revelling by the Gentiles, who dallied with harlots, and had to do with women within the circuit of the holy places, and besides that brought in things that were not lawful.5 The altar also was filled with profane things, which the law forbiddeth.6 Neither was it lawful for a man to keep sabbath days or ancient fasts, or to profess himself at all to be a Jew.7 And in the day of the king's birth every month they were brought by bitter constraint to eat of the sacrifices; and when the fast of Bacchus was kept, the Jews were compelled to go in procession to Bacchus, carrying ivy.8 Moreover there went out a decree to the neighbour cities of the heathen, by the suggestion of Ptolemee, against the Jews, that they should observe the same fashions, and be partakers of their sacrifices:9 And whoso would not conform themselves to the manners of the Gentiles should be put to death. Then might a man have seen the present misery.10 For there were two women brought, who had circumcised their children; whom when they had openly led round about the city, the babes handing at their breasts, they cast them down headlong from the wall.11 And others, that had run together into caves near by, to keep the sabbath day secretly, being discovered by Philip, were all burnt together, because they made a conscience to help themselves for the honour of the most sacred day.12 Now I beseech those that read this book, that they be not discouraged for these calamities, but that they judge those punishments not to be for destruction, but for a chastening of our nation.13 For it is a token of his great goodness, when wicked doers are not suffered any long time, but forthwith punished.14 For not as with other nations, whom the Lord patiently forbeareth to punish, till they be come to the fulness of their sins, so dealeth he with us,15 Lest that, being come to the height of sin, afterwards he should take vengeance of us.16 And therefore he never withdraweth his mercy from us: and though he punish with adversity, yet doth he never forsake his people.17 But let this that we at spoken be for a warning unto us. And now will we come to the declaring of the matter in a few words.18 Eleazar, one of the principal scribes, an aged man, and of a well favoured countenance, was constrained to open his mouth, and to eat swine's flesh.19 But he, choosing rather to die gloriously, than to live stained with such an abomination, spit it forth, and came of his own accord to the torment,